Online Resume Tools for Your Job Hunt

If your most sophisticated level of job hunting tools is the Word template for a resume, you’ll be amazed at the number of tools designed to beef up your resume and job hunting profile. VisualCV Rather than rely on a word document to highlight your selling points to potential employers, why not use a more […]

If your most sophisticated level of job hunting tools is the Word template for a resume, you’ll be amazed at the number of tools designed to beef up your resume and job hunting profile.

VisualCV

Rather than rely on a word document to highlight your selling points to potential employers, why not use a more interactive online version? VisualCV is a multimedia resume that uses video and images to focus on what you want employers to notice. You can:

  • Include YouTube videos of past presentations you’ve delivered
  • Add links to your social profiles
  • Share charts and graphs
  • Upload audio files of podcasts or speeches you’ve given

How to Get the Most Out of It: It’s easy enough to share a link with potential employers to your VisualCV in your application letter. You can search the VisualCV site for jobs and apply directly with your VisualCV profile. You can download a PDF of your VisualCV to respect the formatting.

Cost: VisualCV is a free tool. Sign up here.

ResumeSocial

Need advice on your resume? ResumeSocial is designed to get you feedback on your resume from others who may have held similar positions, work in the same industry or otherwise want to share their two cents.

It works by you posting your resume to your profile. Visitors can leave comments with suggestions. There is also a forum where members can share job hunting techniques and resume tips. Once you join, you’ll also have access to free resume templates, blog posts and job listings.

How to Get the Most Out of It: Connect with others in your industry and specifically ask them for their advice on your resume. Without direct interaction, it seems like your resume has a much lower chance of being critiqued, so to get the most out of this site, be proactive in networking on the forum.

Cost: ResumeSocial is also free.

Razumé

Razumé is another peer review site for resumes. Resume experts offer notes on where you can improve your resume. Some members may be able to comment on specific companies you want to apply for, and provide tips on applying to those companies.

The site also offers informative job search articles, as well as a job database.

How to Get the Most Out of It: Resume advice is only good if you follow it. Take the advice of those that leave comments on your resume to improve your chances of getting a job. Also, it’s handy that you can black out your contact info/employer on your resume, in the event that you do not want your current employer to know you’re job hunting.

Cost: Razumé is free.

Resunate

Curious how your resume will look to employers? Resunate will tell you. Just upload your resume (or LinkedIn profile) and a job description and the software will assess how qualified your resume says you are on a scale of 1-10.

You can also use school templates to make the most of your experience in college to highlight skills employers look for (great for recent grads with little job experience), as well as take a Myers-Briggs® assessment that will generate a list of personality strengths you can highlight when applying for a job.

How to Get the Most Out of It: The Auto Focusing feature will automatically reorder bullet points on your resume to highlight the features a given job description is looking for, better positioning you for the role.

Cost: The Basic Plan is free, with some limitations. Plans start at $14.95 a month after that.

With most of these tools being free, you’ve got nothing to lose by giving them a try. And if they help you secure your next job, you’ll be glad you did!

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