The 3 Cs to Getting Any Job

Scouring the internet you’ll find many job experts touting the secrets to getting your next job, but how many of their systems actually work? Here’s one from Brian Tracy, author of Earn What You’re Really Worth: Maximize Your Income at Any Time, in Any Market, that is simple enough to keep top of mind and […]

Scouring the internet you’ll find many job experts touting the secrets to getting your next job, but how many of their systems actually work? Here’s one from Brian Tracy, author of Earn What You’re Really Worth: Maximize Your Income at Any Time, in Any Market, that is simple enough to keep top of mind and might just help you in securing your next job.

Tracy, a professional speaker and sales trainer, calls this strategy “The Three Cs:”

  • Contacts
  • Credibility
  • Competence

Let’s dig in to each.

Contacts

It’s a fact: the more contacts you have, the greater your chances of finding your next job. Tracy says that 85% or more of job openings are never listed, so the key to finding them is through extending your network. Getting the inside scoop on an unpublished job opening also increases your chances of snagging it, since you’ll likely get a recommendation from whomever told you about the job in the first place.

How do you expand your network? Attend meetings for organizations and clubs in your industry. PRSA events, industry tweetups, major conferences where your industry are good avenues to go out of your way to meet new people. Digitally you can join and participate in LinkedIn Groups (such as the PR & Communications Jobs Community). And without being pushy or annoying, let people know you’re in the market for your next opportunity. Don’t go into networking situations with your hand out; instead, flatter people by asking for their advice, but also be a giver. Work to earn the relationships, and you’ll go much further in finding a job.

Credibility

Do you have a list of people who could vouch for your character at work? At some point in your jobs search, you’ll be asked for references. LinkedIn recommendations can help at first sight of your profile, but you should also have several people who can talk about you and your work openly. You don’t want to be scrambling around trying to piece together references when you are asked.

Competence

It helps to be good at what you do. Employers can easily gauge from your lcareer accomplishments you’d be the type of person to just do the minimum work required, or whether you’d go above and beyond in an effort to better yourself.

Strive to learn more and take on more responsibility. Demonstrate your leadership and team player skills every day, and find ways to reflect this on your resume. Don’t be afraid to take risks in your job; i.e. make suggestions for improvement to your boss, even if you fear they’ll be shot down.

Don’t wait until you’re looking for a new job to work on the 3 Cs. Instead, continually work to increase your network, perform above company standards to ensure your credibility, and constantly strive to improve your performance. If you make this a part of your everyday professional goals, a future job search should be a whole lot easier.

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