Why PR and Marketing Pros Makes for Happy Workers

If you’re wondering where the happy little bees are in your office, take a peek at your PR department. They’re among the happiest of employees, according to the “2013 Aquent AMA Marketing Salary Survey.” The survey, a partnership between global staffing company Aquent and the American Marketing Association, looked at several factors, including which cities [...]

If you’re wondering where the happy little bees are in your office, take a peek at your PR department. They’re among the happiest of employees, according to the "2013 Aquent AMA Marketing Salary Survey.”

The survey, a partnership between global staffing company Aquent and the American Marketing Association, looked at several factors, including which cities pay the most for marketing roles, which jobs are the most demanding, and which are the most satisfying roles. The results give you as an employer insight into what’s going on in marketing and PR.

Don’t Sweat the Raise this Year
While two-thirds of those marketing professionals surveyed said they do expect salary increases in 2013, only about 20% expect them to be an increase of 10% or more. The job market is still shaky, so no one is demanding a raise, at least not right now.

As the U.S. economy gets back on its feet, companies may be able to get away with cutbacks to pay increases for a while longer. But here’s betting that 2014 sees a bit more competition once again when it comes to recruiting and keeping talent. If you’re cutting back on pay raises, don’t plan to make it a long-term habit.

PR Work is Stressful, but Rewarding
Even though Public Relations Executive made it to CNBC’s list of Top 10 Most Stressful Jobs of 2013 (ranking up there with Police Officer and Corporate Exec), the Aquent survey showed a different side of the industry. Professionals working in PR, it seems, are among the most satisfied with their jobs, along with those working in web analytics and strategic planning.

What this means for you is that you’re less likely to see as much turnover in your PR department, assuming you treat your staff well and pay them what they’re worth.

Does Location Really Matter?
Speaking of pay: if you assume that being situated in a major U.S. city means you’ve got to wave a bigger paycheck at your employees, think again. The study showed that Dallas, Saint Louis, and Atlanta provided more generous salaries than major metropolises.

Perhaps this is because these cities want to draw in talented professionals to populate these second-tier metropolitan areas. And it’s not a hard sell to get someone to move to New York City, so why bother offering a larger salary to lure someone there?

When looking at average marketing salaries in a given city, keep in mind the cost of living equation: while Silicon Valley marketers averaged $107,802, cost of living — among the highest in the nation — makes that more like $48,034 elsewhere.

Not sure how what you’re paying your marketing staff stacks up against other cities? Aquent and AMA have a marketing salary tool that will show you what comparable roles are paying in any city.

In addition to the surprise of the smaller cities paying better than the large ones, we also find out that the happiest marketers work in Phoenix, Indianapolis, and Houston. What’s their secret?

If you know your marketing and public relations team are happy and well-paid, that gives you the peace of mind to focus on other departments that might not be so perfect!
 

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