How to Work with a Recruiter to Find the Best Candidate

Working with a recruiter can greatly reduce the time you spend hunting for the ideal job candidate, as well as help you connect with the best talent in your industry. And while the recruiter does the majority of heavy lifting when it comes to the candidate search, you as the employer still have some responsibilities […]

Working with a recruiter can greatly reduce the time you spend hunting for the ideal job candidate, as well as help you connect with the best talent in your industry. And while the recruiter does the majority of heavy lifting when it comes to the candidate search, you as the employer still have some responsibilities to make the candidate search productive.

1. Provide Everything a Recruiter Needs

The more information you give a recruiter, the easier it will be to find the perfect employee. Don’t leave it up to the recruiter to figure out what you’re looking for. Invest time in drafting an in-depth job description that outlines the exact skills and experience you’re looking for and make sure everybody in the hiring process is on the same page. Be enthusiastic about what your company has to offer and answer all of her questions. While sometimes a recruiter’s questions may seem trivial, or perhaps, it feels like it’s too much information – it’s all useful information for us.

It’s important for recruiters to know as much as possible about their client. They need as much information as possible in order to be able to tell candidates why this position and your company is a step in the right direction for their careers.

2. Give the Recruiter Your Screening Requirements

The purpose of working with a recruiter is to find the best candidate for the job; the candidates that may not be easily accessible. It saves you the time and energy upfront in the selection process. That being said, if there are certain things you want a recruiter to screen any possible candidate for, make sure you give her a list of specific questions so she can have them answered in the screening process. Don’t assume the recruiter will do it if you don’t communicate it.

3. Respect the Recruiter’s Time

Being a good client does have its perks. Recruiters want to work hard for you when you are timely with moving forward in the process and with feedback. That means having the position approved before starting the search, responding to questions and concerns, and giving in-depth feedback about candidates throughout the process. Have an upfront discussions on timelines and how to best communicate, managing those expectations upfront.

4. Give Honest Feedback

Recruiters appreciate it when you provide honest and thorough feedback after interviews. When they are way off the mark with the candidates, telling them so and pointing out what didn’t work for you can help them find others candidates who are a better fit.

5. Provide Insight into Your Company

Provide detailed information on your company and its culture to help a recruiter find the best fit for your company. Finding someone who fits on paper is half the battle. The rest comes down to how the team’s personalities mesh with the candidate. Giving them insight into what works and what doesn’t will help them find the perfect fit- both professionally and culturally.

6. Build a Long-Term Relationship

Ideally, a recruiter can get to know your company and help with its staffing needs over the long-term. The more you work with a recruiter, the better she will know your needs and wants, and hopefully the quicker she will be able to identify the right candidates.

7. Don’t Spread Your Wings

It may be tempting to bring on multiple recruiters to help you fill a position, but it crowds the marketplace and baffles job candidates who may be approached by several recruiters for the same position. The candidate perceives it as a disorganized and desperate attempt to fill a job that is so unappealing in the market it needs an army of recruiters working on it. Besides once a contingency recruiter hears the position is going through the hands of other firms, it’s likely nobody is working on the search, or just waiting for a candidate to fall on her lap and make a lucky placement. That’s probably not what you had in mind.

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