7 Hiring Lessons You Should Have Learned This Year

At this time of year, it’s customary for people to reflect on the year that’s passed. Now’s a great time to look back on what worked and didn’t in terms of making smart hiring decisions. That way, you can get a plan for hiring the right people in 2014. You Can’t Always Hire Based on […]

At this time of year, it’s customary for people to reflect on the year that’s passed. Now’s a great time to look back on what worked and didn’t in terms of making smart hiring decisions. That way, you can get a plan for hiring the right people in 2014.

  1. You Can’t Always Hire Based on Your Gut…But Instincts Do Matter.
    If you’ve ever hired a job candidate you had a lot in common with, but found out down the road that she wasn’t such a good fit after all, you’ve learned a valuable lesson. Successful hiring takes more than simply good chemistry with a candidate. Skills, experience, and personality all factor in as well. That being said, don’t ignore your gut. If a candidate looks perfect on paper, but simply rubs you the wrong way, consider why. You might save yourself a lot of stress if you can avoid hiring the wrong person.
  2. You Need to Start Searching Before You Need to Hire.
    A search for an Account Supervisor could take one week or six months! Especially for those high demand levels, you should always be looking and ready to make a hire when the right person comes along. If every one of your competitors is also looking for Account Supervisors, there is a reason good reason why – they are hard to find!
  3. You Can’t Be Vague in Your Job Description.
    The less specific you are with your PR job postings, the more resumes you’ll have to sift through, and the fewer of them will be qualified. Quality trumps quantity. You also risk hiring the wrong person if you don’t know exactly what qualifications and skills you really need.
  4. Ask the Right Questions in the Interview.
    The interview is a critical step in the hiring process, so make sure you bring the right questions. Skip the “what’s your greatest weakness” standards and provide situational examples that will help you gauge how a candidate would handle a real-world situation on the job.
  5. Weigh All Candidates Equally.
    If you identify key criteria that are most important to you in the hiring process (candidate can manage a budget, has experience pitching specific trade media, etc.), you can assess each candidate the same. Ask the same questions in each interview so you can compare apples to apples.
  6. Sometimes You Just Need a Professional.
    If you don’t have a full-time human resources manager on staff, adding the search process to your pile of to-dos may not be the best thing for your company. You probably don’t have the network that a recruiter does, which she can use to zero in on the ideal candidate. A recruiter, however, can quickly tap her network and pre-screen applicants to help you expedite the search process.
  7. Get the Weigh-in of Your Team.
    It’s important that the people that will be working with the new hire have a say in what they want in an employee and everyone is on the same page. Ask what skills are important to them, and make sure the job description you’ve developed accurately describes everyone has agreed is important in the role.

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