10 Things You Wish Job Candidates Knew

If only there were a way to let job seekers know what you really think as an employer. You’d find the right person for the job quicker, and the candidate search process would go much easier! We talked to employers to get their wish list of what they wish job candidates knew. Here’s what they […]

If only there were a way to let job seekers know what you really think as an employer. You’d find the right person for the job quicker, and the candidate search process would go much easier!

We talked to employers to get their wish list of what they wish job candidates knew. Here’s what they had to say.

1. LinkedIn Beats Resumes
Douglas Karr, author of Corporate Blogging for Dummies, says he wishes candidates would stop sending resumes and start populating all the information in their LinkedIn profiles.

“I throw resumes in the trash. They’re useless. Instead, I review LinkedIn and find people in their network to speak to about them.”

2. This Job’s Not About You, It’s About Us
Most applicants don’t realize the role they’re applying for is ultimately to help your business succeed, says Ken Kilpatrick, President of Silvia Marketing & Public Relations.

“If applicants internalized that principle, they would position themselves above other candidates as they would draft their cover letters and conduct their interviews in a manner that would focus on the business’s goals,” Kilpatrick says.

3. We Don’t Like It When You Talk Negatively About Your Past Employer
Whether it’s a former colleague, boss, or the company at large, employers like Matt DeLong of CoreCommerce don’t like to hear bashing.

“If I hire a candidate — I will [one day] be that employer they’re trash talking and my team members will become their colleagues they are bad mouthing.”

4. We Want You to Make Our Job Easy
It’s difficult enough to filter through stacks of resumes, choose several that are nearly qualified, and then interview them. Author Artie Lynnworth says that candidates should make his job easy.

“I want them to quickly convince me that they have the skills needed to do a good job working for me. The better they have prepared, by anticipating what those skills might be and knowing how to communicate details about their past experiences, the more easily they will transmit information about their background and future potential in my company.”

5. Professional Communications are Key if You Want to Get Hired
Elliot D. Lasson, Ph.D., Executive Director at Joblink of Maryland, says everything from a job seeker’s social media profile to her voicemail should be professional if she wants to be taken seriously by employers.

“Don’t have ‘cutesy’ email addresses. Keep them neutral and professional so that employers will take you seriously. Make sure that you have an outgoing voicemail greeting that is
personalized with your voice.”

6. Keywords in Resumes Matter
For many companies, a resume isn’t a creative snapshot of a job applicant, it’s a searchable document that reveals if a candidate has the necessary skills. And to that end, candidates need to include keywords that relate to the job they want, says David Lewis, President / CEO of OperationsInc.

Lewis says that “larger companies filter resumes via a computer, not a person, meaning keywords matter,” he says.

7. We Want You to Love Your Job as Much as We Do
The lazy need not apply at her company, says Lauri Flaquer, author, speaker, and business consultant. She wants applicants to be enthusiastic about joining her company, Saltar Solutions.

“This is my passion, my livelihood and my life. I don’t have time to waste on a 30 minute interview if they aren’t willing to step up to the plate.”

8. You Should Know About Our Companies
There’s nothing more infuriating than interviewing someone who asks what your company does. It’s a sure-fire way to get to the slush pile of resumes. Stephanie Ciccarelli, Co-Founder of Voices.com, says it’s appealing when a candidate understands her company and its culture.

“We get very excited when someone understands our company and even more so when it was our culture that helped attract them to the position.”

9. We Want You to Sell Yourself
New York Times best-selling author and entrepreneur Grant Cardone is frustrated with the job candidate search. He says it’s challenging to find the right people for his team, often because the people he interviews don’t always do a great job of selling themselves to him.

“You need to sell yourself in an interview and don’t tell me what you did for others. I don’t care. I want to know what you can do for me…If you have a great attitude, a positive vibe, good handshake, communicate clearly with eye contact and agreement, you’ll get my attention quicker than some flatliner with a fantastic resume. I’m a sales professional, so naturally I want to see someone can sell themselves, their ideas and sell others on taking action. That’s a leader!”

10. Be Okay with Your Level of Experience
Job candidates often think they’re qualified for positions or salary level that we don’t think they’re ready for. As employers, it’s in our best interest to pick someone who’s truly qualified for a role. Shane Fischer, Attorney at Law, says:

“Unless you’ve got significant experience in the field and can hit the ground running, you’re not going to be paid top dollar; [you] will be expected to prove yourself,” he says.

Fischer says what employers care about is knowing a candidate is up for the work and will strive to succeed in the role.

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