Getting Better Feedback during the Interview Process

 If you’re looking to reduce employee turnover, start with your interview process. Getting feedback, both from candidates and your team can mean the difference between hiring the right person the first time and having to go through several hiring waves for the same role. Use the Right Tools’ You don’t have to rely on just […]

 If you’re looking to reduce employee turnover, start with your interview process. Getting feedback, both from candidates and your team can mean the difference between hiring the right person the first time and having to go through several hiring waves for the same role.

Use the Right Tools’

You don’t have to rely on just interview questions to really assess a candidate’s potential. Many companies, including Hanapin Marketing, use rubrics or scoring systems to fairly assess all candidates on the same criteria.

“For our interview process, we utilize several key components to ensure we get consistent and actionable feedback,” says Chris Martin, Director of Talent and Culture, “Most importantly, we utilize a formal scoring rubric during the process that allows for interviewers to rate/score the candidate in several different key areas of the interview (a great tip for all hiring managers!).”

The areas Hanapin looks at include the candidate’s documents they submitted, their actions during the interview, and their knowledge and skills that are applicable to the job. Because everyone goes through the same process, interviewers at Hanapin have a consistent vantage point to assess a candidate’s abilities, skills, and fit for a specific job within the company.

Get on the Same Page Before the Interview

If you plan to have more than one of your staff members participate in the interview, it’s imperative that you plan ahead, says Chris Costello, Principal and Founder of CBG Benefits.

“Meet in advance to discuss the job position, questions that should be asked, and the timing and flow of the interview process. This sets the tone for what type of feedback they should be looking for and collecting.”

Costello says it’s also a wise idea to create a formal document with sample questions interviewers can ask (along with follow-up probing questions), spots for them to jot down notes, and a place for them to score and rank the interviewee.

Get Feedback from the Potential Hire

Your team isn’t the only one whose opinions should matter to you. David Reischer of Legal Advice likes to get feedback from a potential hire that demonstrates the person is truly engaged with the hiring process.

“The type of feedback I like to receive from the potential hire should also demonstrate a level of engagement that reveals real critical thinking skills of the potential hire. It is of no use to hear a canned response from an interviewee.”

Reischer tries to engage in conversation with the potential hire to try to draw them away from those automated interview responses, as well as encourage problem solving that relates to the type of tasks that the new hire will be engaged with.

When you break out of the norm in an interview, your potential hires are forced to think on the fly, which is a valuable way for you to determine their fit.

Leverage the right tools to assess candidates, plan ahead with your team, and don’t forget to take the input from potential hires into consideration.

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